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SSWITCH

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Neuro Performance Solutions

We know which switches to switch

ATHLETES

The Athletes Brain

Neuro-performance Solutions for athletes, coaches and teams.
Unleash the potential of the athletic body by training at the source of it all, the BRAIN.

Performance Neurology is becoming known worldwide for enabling athletes to get
faster, sharper, stronger and more efficient. It is also hugely successful in rehabilitation
for athletes with reoccurring injures, concussions and performance problems.

This is a highly specialised field and we are the best of the best.

Email us

One on one full Neuro-performance
assessment and programming (6 -12 weeks)
Skype or in person on site. 120 minutes
program inclusive.

3700CHF

One on one follow up Neuro-
Performance assessment and
programming (12 weeks)

2500CHF

Athletes are recommended to be seen and programmed 3-4 times per year. Programs are tailored to
individual athletes needs, sport and time of season.

SOMA

SomaNPT

Soma is the Neuro Performance tech solution for coaches, trainers, athletes, practitioners and clients. This field is the future of athletic development, rehabilitation and complete client care and allows the easy integration of Neuro Performance into current training or rehab regimes.

Soma allows you to assess important data and track progress.
It delivers Neuro Performance tech right into the hands of the client or athlete and enables easy programming of Neuro Performance protocols.

This is the latest in the Neuro Performance world and the only technology of its kind.

Utilise the power of the nervous system and get the edge now.

ANALYTICS

Analysing data is part of being a professional coach. You as well as your athletes, need to know how well things are going and if training is progressing in the right direction. Looking at brain fatigue data is no different. It is important to know exactly where things are heading, and if training sessions are giving the desired outcome.

Soma Analytics

Data driven performance

Analysing data is part of being a professional coach. You as well as your athletes, need to know how well things are going and if training is progressing in the right direction. Looking at brain fatigue data is no different. It is important to know exactly where things are heading, and if training sessions are giving the desired outcome.

BATTLE

• The game where REACTIONS are the only thing that counts.

• Battle friends or anyone in the world LIVE.

• Fastest time wins. It’s that simple.

#BATTLE

Head to Head pure speed.

• The game where REACTIONS are the only thing that counts.

• Battle friends or anyone in the world LIVE.

• Fastest time wins. It’s that simple.

DISRUPT

The ultimate training tool to disrupt your competition
and leave them wondering, What just happened?

Multi Sensory Disruption Training

Disrupt

Did you see that coming?

The ultimate training tool to disrupt your competition
and leave them wondering, What just happened?

Multi Sensory Disruption Training

NEURO ID

Utilising our research lab in Europe or remotely, we can indentify Neuro cognitive strengths and deficits for athletes, coaches or teams.

Understand the athletes brain in deeper detail and let us formulate a winning plan.

Neuro ID

personalized brain assessment

Utilising our research lab in Europe or remotely, we can indentify Neuro cognitive strengths and deficits for athletes, coaches or teams.

Understand the athletes brain in deeper detail and let us formulate a winning plan.

RESEARCH

Research

Altering the perception of effort

Research is vital in understanding the effects of brain fatigue in athletes. Here, the first of a series of studies involving Soma NPT, shows how neurocognitive load changes the way athletes respond to their physical training.

Introduction

neuroscience
of sport performance

In the past decade in the sport world, the attention and interest for neurocognitive processes relating to sport performance has drastically increased. Several studies have recently proved that neurocognitive interventions using computer-based or app-based tasks can produce significant changes in brain processes and affect fatigue perception. Therefore, there has been a lot of focus and attention on strategies to hack the brain to alter perception of effort and thus fatigue in order to boost performance outcomes.

Neurocognitive interventions that induce
brain fatigue can boost performance.

Some of those interventions, aimed to induced mental fatigue (defined as a psychobiological state caused by prolonged periods of demanding cognitive activity and characterized by subjective feelings of “tiredness” and “lack of energy”), have reportedly proved to decrease physical performance. It has been argued that prolonged continuous cognitive activity (from 30 up to 90 min) of specific cognitive tasks, would produce a neurocognitive overload in the brain and thus alter one’s perception during any subsequent physical task. Although overloading the brain has been proven deleterious for physical performance in its acute phase, there is, however, evidence that repetitions of acute stimuli in the form of organized training, may produce an adaptation that would result highly beneficial for performance.

Therefore, we present here the first of a series of investigations aiming to investigate the effect of neurocognitive overload (using SOMA NPT phone application) on physiological, psychological and perceptual responses during resistance training and endurance cycling performance.

Using two different studies, we tested the hypothesis that adding neurocognitive workload on top of traditional physical training would increase perception of effort during the resistance training session and would produce a negative effect on the endurance performance outcome.

SWIPE
Protocol schematic study

Using a randomized crossover design, 12 subjects visited the laboratory on 4 different occasions (two familiarizations and two experimental sessions)

SWIPE

Study one

research methodology

During the first familiarization session we determined individual 1 repetition maximum (RM) which is the maximum weight an individual can lift once in a specific exercise. We repeated it for the six exercises that they will later on perform in the resistance training session. 1 RM was used to determine the individual weight to use for each exercise during the experimental sessions. After being properly familiarized with all tests and measurements, they completed a resistance training session (including 6 basic weight-training exercises) followed by a 20 min cycling time trial in two different conditions. In one condition (SOMA NPT) they were completing app-based neurocognitive tests during pauses for each set or repetition of the resistance training and after that they completed another battery of cognitive tests

for 30 min before beginning the cycling performance. In the control condition, the neurocognitive tests were replaced by emotionally neutral videos. Psychological questionnaires for mood (BRUMS), perceived workload (NASA TLX) and sessional RPE (Borg`s 0-10) were completed at beginning of each experimental visit and at completion of the resistance training session. Cognitive function was assessed using 5 min of the psychomotor vigilant test (PVT) at beginning and at completion of each of the experimental condition. Power output, distance covered, hr, blood lactate and RPE (Borg`s 0-10) were recorded during the cycling time trial.

SWIPE

Study two

research methodology

12 subjects visited the laboratory on three different occasions in a randomized cross over order (one familiarization and two experimental sessions). During familiarization session subjects performed unilateral leg extension of the dominant leg on an inclined bench with increasing weight to determine 1 RM similar to Study One. Meanwhile they were familiarized with the perception of effort scale RPE (Borg’s 0-10). After 1 RM was established, we asked them to lift the equivalent of 20, 40, 60 and 80% of the 1RM previously recorded and hold it in extended position for 3 sec. After each lifting they reported their perception of effort pointing at the RPE scale. Effort was defined as how hard they had to drive their leg to lift the weight without considering any burning sensation arisen from the muscles. During the experimental conditions, subjects filled the mood questionnaire (BRUMS) and they completed either a battery of neurocognitive tests for 90 min (SOMA NPT) or they watched an emotionally neutral video for the same amount of time (Control). Afterwards, they completed again the mood questionnaire and they were asked to perform leg extensions (in the same way as in the familiarization) with four weights corresponding to 20, 40, 60, and 80% of the individual 1RM. Subjects lifted each weight three times with 2 min rest in a randomized order and completely blind of the weight applied. They rated their effort immediately after each lift using the RPE scale.

Results

SOMA increases rating of perceived exertion
Sessional Rating of Perceived Exertion (0-10)
Workload NASA TLX (0-100)

rpe

24%

mental demand

112%

physical demand

no diff

effort

103%

frustration

154%

Results

SOMA alters mood

Mood (BRUMS questionnaire) at the end of resistance training session showed significant higher value for anger, fatigue and boredom and a significant decrease in vigour in SOMA NPT condition compared to control.

Anger

86%

fatigue

35%

vigour

100%
Mood Brums (0-16)

Results

distance and mean power

Power output and distance covered were reduced by circa 7% in the SOMA NPT condition during the cycling time trial. However, no differences have been reported for HR and RPE, blood lactate instead was significantly higher in the control condition. Finally, cognitive function measured as reaction time in PVT test was significantly impaired at the end of the experimental session in the SOMA NPT condition compared to the control one.

Distance, KM
Mean Power, W

Distance

8%

mean power (20 KM)

7.6%

Results

soma challenges cognitive function

Finally, cognitive function measured as reaction time in PVT test was significantly impaired at the end of the experimental session in SOMA NPT condition compared to the control one.

Reaction time, ms
Delta reaction time, ms

reaction time

82%

Results

SOMA increases RPE

Results of the mood questionnaires showed that there is a significant difference in mood values (Anger, Confusion, Fatigue, Vigour and Boredom) due to SOMA NPT neurocognitive intervention compared to control. During the weight lifting task, there is a significant difference in RPE reported for each weight lifting. Values of effort are higher for each % weight in the SOMA NPT condition compared to control.

rpe

20%
Rating of Perceived Exertion (0-10)

conclusion

neuroscience
of sport performance

In the present investigations (split in two studies) we proved that a combination of additional neurocognitive workload with tradition resistance training increased the perceived difficulty of a submaximal resistance training session leaving physiological parameters unaltered and without compromise the quality of the training session. The perceived difficulty showed in the SOMA NPT condition is likely due to the augmented mental workload reported by subjects which may have altered subject`s weight perception as also confirmed by results in Study Two (where RPE was higher when the brain has been previously overload with neurocognitive tasks). Moreover, outcomes during the cycling time trial showed that prolonged cognitive activity before a maximal endurance exercise had a negative impact on performance by altering one’s perception of effort and difficulty of the physical test.

Neurocognitive interventions make
athletes mentally resilient to fatigue

The outcome of this investigation produces evidence that neurocognitive components are an important factor in sport performance and cannot be overlooked. In particular, it highlights that prolonged exposure to specific neurocognitive tasks can produce alteration in perception of effort and thus produce changes in performance outcomes. Similarly, it provided evidence that constructing training plans including neurocognitive interventions will benefit athletes by making them more mentally resilient to fatigue, without affecting their physical training load and routine.

Introduction

neuroscience
of sport performance

In the past decade in the sport world, the attention and interest for neurocognitive processes relating to sport performance has drastically increased. Several studies have recently proved that neurocognitive interventions using computer-based or app-based tasks can produce significant changes in brain processes and affect fatigue perception. Therefore, there has been a lot of focus and attention on strategies to hack the brain to alter perception of effort and thus fatigue in order to boost performance outcomes.

Neurocognitive interventions that induce
brain fatigue can boost performance.

Some of those interventions, aimed to induced mental fatigue (defined as a psychobiological state caused by prolonged periods of demanding cognitive activity and characterized by subjective feelings of “tiredness” and “lack of energy”), have reportedly proved to decrease physical performance. It has been argued that prolonged continuous cognitive activity (from 30 up to 90 min) of specific cognitive tasks, would produce a neurocognitive overload in the brain and thus alter one’s perception during any subsequent physical task. Although overloading the brain has been proven deleterious for physical performance in its acute phase, there is, however, evidence that repetitions of acute stimuli in the form of organized training, may produce an adaptation that would result highly beneficial for performance.

Therefore, we present here the first of a series of investigations aiming to investigate the effect of neurocognitive overload (using SOMA NPT phone application) on physiological, psychological and perceptual responses during resistance training and endurance cycling performance.

Using two different studies, we tested the hypothesis that adding neurocognitive workload on top of traditional physical training would increase perception of effort during the resistance training session and would produce a negative effect on the endurance performance outcome.

SWIPE
Protocol schematic study

Using a randomized crossover design, 12 subjects visited the laboratory on 4 different occasions (two familiarizations and two experimental sessions)

SWIPE
SWIPE

Study one

research methodology

During the first familiarization session we determined individual 1 repetition maximum (RM) which is the maximum weight an individual can lift once in a specific exercise. We repeated it for the six exercises that they will later on perform in the resistance training session. 1 RM was used to determine the individual weight to use for each exercise during the experimental sessions. After being properly familiarized with all tests and measurements, they completed a resistance training session (including 6 basic weight-training exercises) followed by a 20 min cycling time trial in two different conditions. In one condition (SOMA NPT) they were completing app-based neurocognitive tests during pauses for each set or repetition of the resistance training and after that they completed another battery of cognitive tests

for 30 min before beginning the cycling performance. In the control condition, the neurocognitive tests were replaced by emotionally neutral videos. Psychological questionnaires for mood (BRUMS), perceived workload (NASA TLX) and sessional RPE (Borg`s 0-10) were completed at beginning of each experimental visit and at completion of the resistance training session. Cognitive function was assessed using 5 min of the psychomotor vigilant test (PVT) at beginning and at completion of each of the experimental condition. Power output, distance covered, hr, blood lactate and RPE (Borg`s 0-10) were recorded during the cycling time trial.

SWIPE

Study two

research methodology

12 subjects visited the laboratory on three different occasions in a randomized cross over order (one familiarization and two experimental sessions). During familiarization session subjects performed unilateral leg extension of the dominant leg on an inclined bench with increasing weight to determine 1 RM similar to Study One. Meanwhile they were familiarized with the perception of effort scale RPE (Borg’s 0-10). After 1 RM was established, we asked them to lift the equivalent of 20, 40, 60 and 80% of the 1RM previously recorded and hold it in extended position for 3 sec. After each lifting they reported their perception of effort pointing at the RPE scale. Effort was defined as how hard they had to drive their leg to lift the weight without considering any burning

sensation arisen from the muscles. During the experimental conditions, subjects filled the mood questionnaire (BRUMS) and they completed either a battery of neurocognitive tests for 90 min (SOMA NPT) or they watched an emotionally neutral video for the same amount of time (Control). Afterwards, they completed again the mood questionnaire and they were asked to perform leg extensions (in the same way as in the familiarization) with four weights corresponding to 20, 40, 60, and 80% of the individual 1RM. Subjects lifted each weight three times with 2 min rest in a randomized order and completely blind of the weight applied. They rated their effort immediately after each lift using the RPE scale.

Results

SOMA increases rating of perceived exertion
Sessional Rating of Perceived Exertion (0-10)
Workload NASA TLX (0-100)

rpe

24%

mental demand

112%

physical demand

no diff

effort

103%

frustration

154%

Results

SOMA alters mood

Mood (BRUMS questionnaire) at the end of resistance training session showed significant higher value for anger, fatigue and boredom and a significant decrease in vigour in SOMA NPT condition compared to control.

Anger

86%

fatigue

35%

vigour

100%
Mood Brums (0-16)

Results

distance and mean power

Power output and distance covered were reduced by circa 7% in the SOMA NPT condition during the cycling time trial. However, no differences have been reported for HR and RPE, blood lactate instead was significantly higher in the control condition. Finally, cognitive function measured as reaction time in PVT test was significantly impaired at the end of the experimental session in the SOMA NPT condition compared to the control one.

Distance, KM
Mean Power, W

Distance

8%

mean power (20 KM)

7.6%

Results

soma challenges cognitive function

Finally, cognitive function measured as reaction time in PVT test was significantly impaired at the end of the experimental session in SOMA NPT condition compared to the control one.

Reaction time, ms
Delta reaction time, ms

reaction time

82%

Results

SOMA increases RPE

Results of the mood questionnaires showed that there is a significant difference in mood values (Anger, Confusion, Fatigue, Vigour and Boredom) due to SOMA NPT neurocognitive intervention compared to control. During the weight lifting task, there is a significant difference in RPE reported for each weight lifting. Values of effort are higher for each % weight in the SOMA NPT condition compared to control.

rpe

20%
Rating of Perceived Exertion (0-10)

conclusion

neuroscience
of sport performance

In the present investigations (split in two studies) we proved that a combination of additional neurocognitive workload with tradition resistance training increased the perceived difficulty of a submaximal resistance training session leaving physiological parameters unaltered and without compromise the quality of the training session. The perceived difficulty showed in the SOMA NPT condition is likely due to the augmented mental workload reported by subjects which may have altered subject`s weight perception as also confirmed by results in Study Two (where RPE was higher when the brain has been previously overload with neurocognitive tasks). Moreover, outcomes during the cycling time trial showed that prolonged cognitive activity before a maximal endurance exercise had a negative impact on performance by altering one’s perception of effort and difficulty of the physical test.

Neurocognitive interventions make
athletes mentally resilient to fatigue

The outcome of this investigation produces evidence that neurocognitive components are an important factor in sport performance and cannot be overlooked. In particular, it highlights that prolonged exposure to specific neurocognitive tasks can produce alteration in perception of effort and thus produce changes in performance outcomes. Similarly, it provided evidence that constructing training plans including neurocognitive interventions will benefit athletes by making them more mentally resilient to fatigue, without affecting their physical training load and routine.